Hannawa, Annegret Aggiorna dati

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  • +41 58 666 4482

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  • Ex Laboratorio, Ufficio 011 (Livello 0)
    Via Buffi 13, 6904 Lugano

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Biografia

Annegret Hannawa is Senior Assistant Professor of Health Communication at the Institute of Communication and Health. She obtained her higher educational degrees at San Diego State University (B.A., M.A., Interpersonal Communication and Quantitative Research Methods) and Arizona State University (Ph.D., Interpersonal Communication, Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods) in the United States of America. Prior to joining the faculty at USI, she served as Assistant Professor of Health Communication and Empirical Research Methods at Wake Forest University in North Carolina. In her academic discipline, she has served as secretary-elect for the interpersonal communication division of the Western United States Communication Association and as an ad-hoc reviewer for Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Health Communication, Swiss Medical Weekly, Communication Meassures and Methods, and Journal of Family Communication.

Professor Hannawa’s scientific expertise lies in the domains of interpersonal communication and advanced quantitative methodology. Her research agenda focuses on transdisciplinary approaches to optimizing health care delivery, and positive health outcomes that can be achieved through competent interpersonal interaction. Her most recent grant (funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation) conceptualizes and operationalizes Medical Error Disclosure Competence (MEDC) as an empirical construct. Furtnermore, she has developed a Tool for Retrospective Analysis of Critical Events (TRACE), which operationalizes a theoretically framed, interdisciplinary conceptualization of medical error. Her research also examines physicians’ verbal and nonverbal disclosure styles of medical errors to patients that facilitate positive and negative physiological (e.g., patient and physician well-being), psychological (e.g., rumination, distress, feelings of guilt), relational (e.g., trust, forgiveness, satisfaction), organizational (e.g., litigation), and systemic (e.g., doctor-switching) health outcomes. Prof. Hannawa founded and now chairs the COME ("Communicating Medical Error") Organzation, which actively pursues interdisciplinary research collaborations between communication science and medicine.

Professor Hannawa’s studies have been published in a variety of distinguished journals such as Health Communication, Patient Education and Counseling, Communication Studies, Communication Methods and Measures, Swiss Medical Weekly, Journal of Family Communication, Western Journal of Communication, Violence and Victims, and Therapeutische Umschau. Three of her investigations have received “Top Paper Awards” by the U.S. National Communication Association.

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Ricerca

Professor Hannawas expertise lies in interpersonal health communication and advanced quantitative methodology. Her research agenda focuses on effective health care delivery and positive health outcomes that can be achieved through competent interpersonal interaction. Her most recent research examines physicians verbal and nonverbal disclosure styles of medical errors to patients that facilitate positive and negative physiological (e.g., patient and physician well-being), psychological (e.g., rumination, distress, feelings of guilt), relational (e.g., trust, forgiveness, satisfaction), and organizational (e.g., litigation) health outcomes. She also investigates how competent interaction can facilitate medical error prevention and intervention. Professor Hannawas studies have been published in a variety of distinguished journals such as Health Communication, Patient Education and Counseling, Communication Studies, Communication Methods and Measures, Swiss Medical Weekly, Therapeutische Umschau, Journal of Family Communication, Western Journal of Communication, and Violence and Victims. Four of her investigations received Top Paper Awards by the U.S. National Communication Association and the Patient Safety Foundation Switzerland.

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