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Marco Lamanna

https://usi.to/bhfj

Biography

Marco Lamanna is qualified as an Associate Professor of History of Philosophy. After getting his PhD (2008), he worked as a Fellow at the Istituto Nazionale di Studi sul Rinascimento in Florence (2010–2012) and as a researcher (rtdA) at the Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa (2013–2016). From 2014 to 2019 he gave courses on ontology, ontology of law, history of ancient, medieval, Renaissance and modern philosophy, history of philosophical psychology at the Scuola Normale and, in the capacity of Lecturer, at the Istituto di Studi Filosofici of the Facoltà di Teologia in Lugano.

A Fellow in German research centers (Gotha and Wolfenbüttel), from 2016 to 2019 Lamanna was a SNSF-Researcher (SNF-Forschungsmitarbeiter) at the Theological Faculty at Lucerne: https://data.snf.ch/grants/grant/165815.  

In October 2017 he was awarded The Natalie Zemon Davis Prize in Toronto (Canada): https://jps.library.utoronto.ca/index.php/renref/PrizeAnnouncements. In the 2019–2020 academic year, he was Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Fellow at Villa I Tatti, the Center for Italian Renaissance Studies of Harvard University: https://itatti.harvard.edu/people/marco-lamanna.  

From 2020 to 2023 he has again been working at the Theological Faculty of the University of Lucerne within another SNSF-Project: https://data.snf.ch/grants/grant/192559.

Together with Prof. Martin Mulsow (Universität Erfurt – Forschungszentrum Gotha) he is Director of the Summerschool on the German-Italian “Renaissance” at Villa Vigoni – The German-Italian Center for the European Dialogue (Menaggio – Como).

He is currently serving as a Researcher at the Cattedra 'Eugenio Corecco' of the Facoltà di Teologia di Lugano (https://www.ftl.usi.ch/it/facolta-teologia/unita-accademiche/cattedra-corecco), focusing on the ontologization of faith and theology and the Anglophone (esp. North American) reception of Corecco's theory.

Marco Lamanna is engaged in the Opera omnia project of the scientific writings of Eugenio Corecco (Bishop of Lugano).